About Stephanie Ronco

Stephanie Ronco has been editing for Food and Health Communications since 2011. She graduated from Colorado College magna cum laude with distinction in Comparative Literature. She was elected a member of Phi Beta Kappa in 2008.

 

October 2022 Newsletter and Resources for Premium Food and Health Communication Members:

Table of Contents:

  • Read-offline PDF newsletter
  • Research update for professionals
  • White label newsletter
  • Shareable articles and handouts
  • Graphic of the month
  • Special member-only discounts

Read-Offline PDF:

Here's the entire PDF edition of the October 2022 Newsletter, ready for you to download to read offline, print for your next meeting or presentation, or distribute however you see fit!

(You can click the image to download it).

Professional’s Corner:

Article Links to Share with Your Clients:

  1. SW Chicken Bowl: by Judy Doherty, MPS, PC II
  2. Cranberry Kale Salad: by Judy Doherty, MPS, PC II
  3. The Impact of a High-Fat Diet on Your Brain by Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD
  4. Let's Talk About Mung Bean Protein by Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDCES, CHWC, CPT
  5. Let's Talk About Pea Protein by Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDCES, CHWC, CPT
  6. The Pros and Cons of Instacart by Judy Doherty, MPS, PC II
  7. MyPlate Menu Planning Guide: New Ideas by Judy Doherty, MPS, PC II

October Image 2022:

Editor's Note:

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Discounts:

Use code FALL22 at the nutritioneducationstore.com to save big on supplies or TRY10NOW at foodandhealth.com for a discount on membership renewals and classes.

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November 2022

 

Strategies for Managing Processed Foods in Your Eating Pattern

UP NEXT IN Food and Health, Prevention
Ultra-Processed Foods Promote Colorectal Cancer in Men

New Products Available Now

 
Published on Categories nutrition, articles, practitioner ideas and news, prevention, food shopping, food and health, ingredients, food news, food reviews, nutrition education resources, diet and cancer, PremiumTags , , , , , , , , ,

More and more people are becoming aware of the benefits of consuming optimum amounts of protein:  

  • Protein is the building block for hormones, enzymes, muscles, cartilage, skin and bones.
  • Protein helps promote feeling satisfied with meals.
  • Protein foods contain a wide variety of minerals, vitamins, and phytochemicals. 

There are a variety of foods that are good sources of protein: meat, chicken, seafood, eggs, cheese, yogurt (especially Greek yogurt with twice the amount of protein as regular yogurt), nuts, seeds, legumes (dried beans and peas like lentils, chickpeas, and red beans) and soy foods.

One of the newer sources of plant protein on the scene comes from mung beans. You can find this type of protein added to foods such as protein shakes, energy bars, vegan dairy substitutes, and meat alternatives like the Beyond Burger and Chicken-Free Chicken.

What is Mung Bean Protein?

The mung bean is a type of legume that was originally grown in India over 2000 years ago. It’s found throughout Southeast Asia as a primary protein source where animal meat is expensive and not easily available.

Raw, mature mung beans are de-hulled and milled to make a flour, which is then mixed with water to form a slurry. Next, the protein extract is removed from the slurry, then pasteurized and dried to form mung bean protein isolate. 

Why Use Mung Bean Protein Isolate?

Researchers have discovered that mung bean protein isolate is a source of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor activity that helps to lower blood pressure. It also carries out anti-fungal and antibacterial activity that is important for food safety and preservation, and trypsin inhibitory activity that has an influence on satiety. In 2016, the FDA granted mung bean protein isolate GRAS status (generally recognized as safe) in levels from 3-90% in foods including cereal, granola bars, crackers, protein powders and drinks, non-dairy foods (such as vegan cheese, vegan yogurt and vegan ice cream), pasta, vegan egg products, snack chips, and meat analogues. 

Mung Bean Protein Safety:

If you have a soy allergy, you could be allergic to mung beans, too, as they both belong to the legume family and can be cross-reactive. 

Our Views on Mung Bean Protein:

When purchasing foods, it’s essential to review not only the nutrition facts, but also the list of ingredients so that you know exactly what you’re buying. Plant sources of protein come in many forms, and some may contain more sodium, added sugars, or flavorings than you realize. Plant-based proteins offer a variety of health benefits and can be a great-tasting addition to your usual food choices. 

By Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDCES, CPT, CHWC

References:

  1. USDA. MyPlate. Protein foods. https://www.myplate.gov/eat-healthy/protein-foods accessed 8-10-22.
  2. Fuji Europe Africa BV. Mung Bean Protein Isolate. https://fujieuropeafrica.com/our-plant-based-solutions/mung-bean-protein-isolate/  accessed 8-10-22.
  3. Brishti, F.H., Zarei, M., Muhammad, S.K.S., Ismail-Fitry, M.R., Shukri, R. and Saari, N. Evaluation of the functional properties of mung bean protein isolate for development of textured vegetable protein. International Food Research Journal 24(4): 1595-1605 (August 2017)
  4. Michigan State University. Center for Research on Ingredient Safety. Trending – Mung Bean Protein. Elisabeth AndersonJinpeng Li. https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/trending-mung-bean-protein published 5-17-21; accessed 8-10-22. 
  5. Herman LL, Padala SA, Ahmed I, et al. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEI) [Updated 2022 Jul 1]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK431051/
  6. Cristina Oliveira de Lima V, Piuvezam G, Leal Lima Maciel B, Heloneida de Araújo Morais A. Trypsin inhibitors: promising candidate satietogenic proteins as complementary treatment for obesity and metabolic disorders? J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem. 2019 Dec;34(1):405-419. doi: 10.1080/14756366.2018.1542387. PMID: 30734596; PMCID: PMC6327991.
  7. Office of Food Additive Safety Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Food and Drug Administration. GRAS Notice #684. Mung Bean Protein Isolate. https://www.fda.gov/media/103224/download#:~:text=The%20mung%20bean%20protein%20isolate,w%20of%20the%20final%20product. Published 12-15-16; accessed 8-10-22.
  8. Cleveland Clinic. Everything You Should Know about Pea Protein. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/pea-protein/#:~:text=Pea%20protein%20isolate%3A%20One%20of,your%20diet%2C%E2%80%9D%20says%20DiMarino. Published 11-26-21’ accessed 8-11-22.
  9. Ge J, Sun CX, Corke H, Gul K, Gan RY, Fang Y. The health benefits, functional properties, modifications, and applications of pea (Pisum sativum L.) protein: Current status, challenges, and perspectives. Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf. 2020 Jul;19(4):1835-1876. doi: 10.1111/1541-4337.12573. Epub 2020 Jun 22. PMID: 33337084.
  10. Office of Food Additive Safety Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Food and Drug Administration. GRAS Notice #804. Pea Protein GRAS Notice. https://www.fda.gov/media/133594/download. Posted 6-18-18; accessed 8-12-22.
  11. Healthline. Pea Protein Powder: Nutrition, Benefits and Side Effects. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/pea-protein-powder. Accessed 8-12-22.
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November 2022

 

Strategies for Managing Processed Foods in Your Eating Pattern

UP NEXT IN Food and Health, Prevention
Ultra-Processed Foods Promote Colorectal Cancer in Men

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Published on Categories nutrition, articles, practitioner ideas and news, prevention, food shopping, food and health, ingredients, food news, food reviews, nutrition education resources, diet and cancer, PremiumTags , , , , , , , , ,

 

After shopping online for groceries for over five years, here are the pros and cons I've discovered along the way.

Five Pros:

  1. Instacart and many local store delivery services can often beat Amazon for speed and price. I always compare to see which is best. 
  2. Instacart and local grocery services offer a very convenient grocery shopping experience even beyond your grocery list. Using Instacart offers a great way to send gifts to people -- flowers and food from the grocery store are much more reasonable than online gift catalogs. 
  3. Now that Instacart has added a "shopping by aisle" feature, it is just as easy to navigate as a real store. The app also remembers what you put in your cart, which makes for an excellent start to your next grocery list.
  4. You can compare prices and nutrition facts, buy in-season items, and just about anything you would buy in an actual store. Except you get to skip the traffic, parking, and lengthy checkout process.
  5. One more great thing about the app is that you can always be aware of how much you are spending before you check out! It's very enlightening to scroll down and see how much processed foods like cookies, chips, and sodas cost per serving. And then delete them!

Two Cons:

  1. One downside of Instacart is that the store can be out of items even though you purchased them online. There are settings to help everyone, and you can pick between “substitute" and "refund. “ Watch your phone for alerts from shoppers when they start shopping. Some shoppers are very good about substituting, while others just refund whatever they can’t find, but hey, not all of us are black belt shoppers!
  2. It is more fun to shop in a real store for ideas and inspiration. Don’t pressure yourself to shop online all the time. To get a real-life experience, I often go to the farmers market on the weekend, where I can meet the growers and see what is local and in season.

By Judy Doherty, MPS, PCII

All in all, I have saved thousands of hours of time while supporting local businesses and shoppers by using Instacart. So my thumbs are way up for the process!

Happy shopping!

By Judy Doherty, MPS, PCII

*Instacart is a grocery shopping service available in most areas and has a smartphone app you can download. Once you create an account and log in, you can search for items in local stores. When you add them to your cart and check out, you typically can get them delivered in a day or two.

Become a premium member today and get access to hundreds of articles and handouts plus our premium tools!

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November 2022

 

Strategies for Managing Processed Foods in Your Eating Pattern

UP NEXT IN Food and Health, Prevention
Ultra-Processed Foods Promote Colorectal Cancer in Men

New Products Available Now

 
Published on Categories nutrition, articles, practitioner ideas and news, prevention, food shopping, food and health, ingredients, food news, food reviews, nutrition education resources, diet and cancer, PremiumTags , , , , , , , , ,

 

A recent study conducted at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai and published in the journal Hypertension found that even fully vaccinated and boosted individuals had double the risk of hospitalization related to Omicron if they had high blood pressure. 

Nearly 1 in 2 American adults deals with hypertension, so the risk is very high according to the CDC. Although the viral variant may only cause mild symptoms in most people, it’s really important to avoid the infection, notes Joseph E. Ebinger, MD, a clinical cardiologist and director of clinical analytics at the Smidt Heart Institute and first author of the study.

The researchers at Cedars-Sinai reviewed medical records and found 912 fully vaccinated and boosted patients that experienced COVID-19 during the Omicron surge in Southern California between Dec 1, 2021, and April 20, 2021. In this group, 145 needed to be hospitalized.

"We were surprised to learn that many people who were hospitalized with COVID-19 had hypertension and no other risk factors," said Susan Cheng, MD, MPH, director of the Institute for Research on Healthy Aging in the Department of Cardiology at the Smidt Heart Institute and a senior author of the study. "This is concerning when you consider that almost half of American adults have high blood pressure."

Researchers also discovered that having a previous heart attack, heart failure or chronic kidney disease dramatically increased the hospitalization risk following infection. 

"These findings were expected considering that these are chronic medical conditions that are well established to be associated with worse outcomes," said Ebinger, an assistant professor in the Department of Cardiology in the Smidt Heart Institute.

As high blood pressure is common in those with chronic kidney disease, heart failure and heart attack, the researchers did an analysis that left out individuals diagnosed with these conditions. In those diagnosed solely with hypertension, the risk for hospitalization was still very high. 

In addition, the risk of hospitalization due to COVID-19 increased with age and time between a study subject’s last vaccination and infection. Having high blood pressure is still linked with the greatest chance of risk: 2.6-fold.

This data adds to earlier reports on the pandemic that also saw a connection between severe COVID-19 and hypertension. Conditions including obesity and diabetes that were discovered as risks early on in the pandemic were not as strongly linked with hospitalization in the Omicron surge. Hypertension risk, however, continued. Additional research is necessary to understand the biological conditions that may result in more severe COVID-19 illness in those with high blood pressure and how to lower this risk. 

"Uncovering why hypertension is linked to COVID-19 could help us better understand how SARS-CoV-2 affects the body and provide clearer targets for prevention and treatment," said Cheng, the Erika J. Glazer Chair in Women's Cardiovascular Health and Population Science at Cedars-Sinai.

Ebenger asserts that in the meantime, those with hypertension who catch COVID-19 should be made aware of their higher risk of being hospitalized and should discuss antiviral therapy with their medical providers. 

Clinicians can give the following tips to their clients with hypertension:

  1. Encourage clients to take medication when it’s prescribed. Hypertension is known as the “silent killer” for a reason.
  2. Add more high-potassium fruits and vegetables to meals as part of the DASH diet. Add kale, spinach, or chopped tomatoes to soups, salads, and sandwiches. Choose seasonal fruit such as peaches, melon, kiwi and citrus for dessert.
  3. Include low-fat dairy or non-dairy products for adequate calcium and vitamin D.
  4. Avoid fad diets that may impact blood pressure and kidney function.
  5. Take COVID-19 seriously. Maintain vaccination status and masking.

By Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

Reference:

  1. Joseph Ebinger, Matthew Driver, Sandy Joung, Teresa Tran, Denisse Barajas, Min Wu, Patrick Botting, Jesse Navarrette, Nancy Sun, Susan Cheng. Hypertension and Excess Risk for Severe COVID-19 Illness Despite Booster VaccinationHypertension, July 20, 2022; DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.122.19694

 

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November 2022

 

Strategies for Managing Processed Foods in Your Eating Pattern

UP NEXT IN Food and Health, Prevention
Ultra-Processed Foods Promote Colorectal Cancer in Men

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We’re hearing a lot of information about the benefits of plant sources of protein: fiber (animal sources of protein don’t contain any fiber), which promotes a healthy digestive tract, unsaturated fats that support a healthy cardiovascular system, and antioxidants that promote overall health. To gain these benefits, include plant sources of protein with meals and snacks:

  • Add nuts to cereal or yogurt for breakfast
  • Spread nut butter on whole grain crackers or celery sticks for a snack
  • Enjoy a stir-fry with tofu and a variety of vegetables
  • Include lentil, black bean, or split pea soup in your food choices
  • Toss red beans or chickpeas into salads

One of the newer sources of plant protein on the scene is pea protein. You can find it added to foods like protein shakes, energy bars, vegan dairy substitutes, and meat alternatives (Beyond Burger, Chicken-Free Chicken, etc).

What is Pea Protein? 

There are three types of pea protein, all prepared from yellow split peas:

  • Pea protein isolate, which is made by drying peas and then processing them into a powder. Pea protein isolate contains only the amino acids naturally found in the peas. It can be added to foods such as energy bars and cereals or you can add it to smoothies, muffins, or cooked cereals at home.
  • Pea protein concentrate contains carbohydrate and fat as well as protein and is often used in pet food, energy bars, and smoothies.
  • Textured pea protein is most often used to make vegetarian meat substitutes.

Why Use Pea Protein?

Pea protein adds a creamy texture to smoothies and is naturally gluten- and lactose-free. It's high in branched chain amino acids, which help build muscle. However, it's low in two essential amino acids –- methionine and tryptophan. Animal research shows that pea protein has several potential health benefits, including reducing blood pressure, lowering cholesterol, and improving the gut microbiome. Pea protein also contains 5-7.5mg iron per serving, which is 28-42% of the recommended daily value. 

Pea Protein Safety:

Pea protein obtained GRAS status (generally recognized as safe) from the FDA in 2018 to be used in a variety of different types of foods including baked goods, breakfast cereals, dairy product analogs, and snack foods. Pea protein is well-tolerated by most people and contains none of the top eight food allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, fish, shellfish, cow’s milk, wheat, and soy. If you are allergic to split peas, however, you will also need to avoid pea protein. 

Our Thoughts About Pea Protein:

When purchasing foods, it’s essential to review not only the nutrition facts, but also the list of ingredients so that you know exactly what you’re purchasing. Plant sources of protein come in many forms, and some may contain more sodium, added sugars, or flavorings than you realize. Plant-based proteins offer a variety of health benefits and can be a great-tasting addition to your usual food choices. 

By Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDCES, CPT, CHWC

References:

  1. USDA. MyPlate. Protein foods. https://www.myplate.gov/eat-healthy/protein-foods accessed 8-10-22.
  2. Fuji Europe Africa BV. Mung Bean Protein Isolate. https://fujieuropeafrica.com/our-plant-based-solutions/mung-bean-protein-isolate/  accessed 8-10-22.
  3. Brishti, F.H., Zarei, M., Muhammad, S.K.S., Ismail-Fitry, M.R., Shukri, R. and Saari, N. Evaluation of the functional properties of mung bean protein isolate for development of textured vegetable protein. International Food Research Journal 24(4): 1595-1605 (August 2017)
  4. Michigan State University. Center for Research on Ingredient Safety. Trending – Mung Bean Protein. Elisabeth AndersonJinpeng Li. https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/trending-mung-bean-protein published 5-17-21; accessed 8-10-22. 
  5. Herman LL, Padala SA, Ahmed I, et al. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEI) [Updated 2022 Jul 1]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK431051/
  6. Cristina Oliveira de Lima V, Piuvezam G, Leal Lima Maciel B, Heloneida de Araújo Morais A. Trypsin inhibitors: promising candidate satietogenic proteins as complementary treatment for obesity and metabolic disorders? J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem. 2019 Dec;34(1):405-419. doi: 10.1080/14756366.2018.1542387. PMID: 30734596; PMCID: PMC6327991.
  7. Office of Food Additive Safety Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Food and Drug Administration. GRAS Notice #684. Mung Bean Protein Isolate. https://www.fda.gov/media/103224/download#:~:text=The%20mung%20bean%20protein%20isolate,w%20of%20the%20final%20product. Published 12-15-16; accessed 8-10-22.
  8. Cleveland Clinic. Everything You Should Know about Pea Protein. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/pea-protein/#:~:text=Pea%20protein%20isolate%3A%20One%20of,your%20diet%2C%E2%80%9D%20says%20DiMarino. Published 11-26-21’ accessed 8-11-22.
  9. Ge J, Sun CX, Corke H, Gul K, Gan RY, Fang Y. The health benefits, functional properties, modifications, and applications of pea (Pisum sativum L.) protein: Current status, challenges, and perspectives. Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf. 2020 Jul;19(4):1835-1876. doi: 10.1111/1541-4337.12573. Epub 2020 Jun 22. PMID: 33337084.
  10. Office of Food Additive Safety Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Food and Drug Administration. GRAS Notice #804. Pea Protein GRAS Notice. https://www.fda.gov/media/133594/download. Posted 6-18-18; accessed 8-12-22.
  11. Healthline. Pea Protein Powder: Nutrition, Benefits and Side Effects. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/pea-protein-powder. Accessed 8-12-22.
Become a premium member today and get access to hundreds of articles and handouts plus our premium tools!

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November 2022

 

Strategies for Managing Processed Foods in Your Eating Pattern

UP NEXT IN Food and Health, Prevention
Ultra-Processed Foods Promote Colorectal Cancer in Men

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Published on Categories nutrition, articles, practitioner ideas and news, prevention, food shopping, food and health, ingredients, food news, food reviews, nutrition education resources, diet and cancer, PremiumTags , , , , , , , , ,

 

Everyone craves a bit of ice cream or chocolate now and then when they’re anxious or sad. But a new study suggests that chronic intake of these foods may not only increase anxiety and depression but may also accelerate Alzheimer’s disease.

The study -- done in South Africa by neuroscientists Professor Xin-Fu Zhou and Associate Professor Larisa Bobrovskaya -- reveals a direct link between a high-fat diet and an increase in diabetes, as well as a decline in cognitive abilities, such as the development of anxiety, depression, and worsening Alzheimer’s disease. Excessive weight gain was also noted in the subjects with altered cognitive function related to poor metabolism from changes in the brain.

This study was published in Metabolic Brain Disease.

Associate Professor and UniSA neuroscientist and biochemist Larisa Bobrovskaya notes that the research validates previous research which connected chronic obesity and diabetes with Alzheimer’s disease, which is predicted to increase to 100 million cases by 2050.

Bobrovskaya notes, "Obesity and diabetes impair the central nervous system, exacerbating psychiatric disorders and cognitive decline. We demonstrated this in our study with mice."

The researchers randomly assigned the mice to standard chow or a high-fat diet for 30 weeks beginning when the mice were 8 weeks old. Food consumption, body weight, and levels of glucose were evaluated at different times. The mice were also given glucose and insulin tolerance tests and checked for cognitive dysfunction. 

Not surprisingly, the mice fed a high-fat diet gained significant weight, developed insulin resistance, and began behaving abnormally compared to mice fed a standard diet. 

When fed a high-fat diet, mice with genetically modified Alzheimer’s disease show a bigger decline in cognition and pathological changes in the brain. 

In individuals with obesity, there is a 55% increase risk for the development of depression. In individuals with obesity and diabetes, that risk is doubled, according to Bobrovskaya.

The authors emphasize the importance of treating the global obesity epidemic as a combination of age, obesity, and diabetes. This epidemic may very likely result in a decline in cognitive abilities, Alzheimer’s disease, and additional mental illness diagnoses. 

Here's how to help your clients who are dealing with obesity and diabetes:

  1. Encourage small changes in weight. Even a 5 to 7% reduction in weight may improve blood sugar.
  2. Consider intermittent fasting (IF) for weight loss and blood sugar management. Research suggests IF may protect the brain in several ways. 2
  3. Adopt an exercise program to aid in weight management, blood sugar control, and reduced risk of depression and mental health conditions.
  4. Treat obesity as a chronic disease that needs consistent management. Discourage the use of fad diets when possible.
  5. Refer patients to mental health professionals if overeating is preventing weight loss.

By Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

References:

  1. Jing Xiong, Isaac Deng, Sally Kelliny, Liying Lin, Larisa Bobrovskaya, Xin-Fu Zhou. Long term high fat diet induces metabolic disorders and aggravates behavioral disorders and cognitive deficits in MAPT P301L transgenic miceMetabolic Brain Disease, 2022; DOI: 10.1007/s11011-022-01029-x
  2. Shin BK, Kang S, Kim DS, Park S. Intermittent fasting protects against the deterioration of cognitive function, energy metabolism and dyslipidemia in Alzheimer's disease-induced estrogen deficient rats. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2018 Feb;243(4):334-343. doi: 10.1177/1535370217751610. Epub 2018 Jan 7. PMID: 29307281; PMCID: PMC6022926.
Become a premium member today and get access to hundreds of articles and handouts plus our premium tools!

Upcoming Posts


November 2022

 

Strategies for Managing Processed Foods in Your Eating Pattern

UP NEXT IN Food and Health, Prevention
Ultra-Processed Foods Promote Colorectal Cancer in Men

New Products Available Now

 
Published on Categories nutrition, articles, practitioner ideas and news, prevention, food shopping, food and health, ingredients, food news, food reviews, nutrition education resources, diet and cancer, PremiumTags , , , , , , , , ,