What we know so far

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve likely been deluged by reports of the Coronavirus daily. It’s also known as COVID-19 since it was discovered late last year. This respiratory virus, which originated in Wuhan City, China, has now made its way to the US with over 75 confirmed cases to date. Here’s what we know thus far. 1

The virus has spread to nearly 40 locations internationally and is considered a public health emergency by the World Health Organization (WHO). The US declared it a public health emergency at the end of January. The virus itself is common in certain animals including bats, cats, camel, and cattle. The outbreak in China was initially thought to have started at a seafood and live animal market, indicating animal-to- person transmission. The spread of the virus is now more likely person-to-person, though some infected individuals do not know how they contracted the virus. 1

Symptoms of the virus may appear as early as 2 days and up to 14 days after exposure and are similar to the flu including fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Symptoms can range from mild to severe and currently 2,800 people have died from the virus. CDC estimates that so far this season there have been at least 32 million flu illnesses, 310,000 hospitalizations and 18,000 deaths from flu. 2   Those at higher risk of infection include infants, the elderly and individuals with compromised immune systems such as HIV, AIDS or individuals that take immunocompromising drugs such as MS, RA, and Lupus. 1

How to stay healthy

Like any other contagious disease, your best bet to staying healthy is to avoid being around sick people and wash your hands frequently. Don’t forget to lather your hands with soap for 20 seconds, rinse, and dry your hands. In addition, never underestimate the power of sleep, exercise, and a nutritious diet to keep your immune system strong.

Adequate sleep allows the body and brain to rest and there are multiple reasons why sleep affects the immune system. To begin with, adequate sleep improves T cell function, a type of white blood cell that tailors the body’s response to specific pathogens and disease. Sleep also produces cytokines- a type of protein that targets infection and inflammation in the body. 3 Getting enough sleep also impacts the gut microbiome. Adequate sleep improves the diversity of bacteria in the gut, and in turn, sleep quality is affected by the gut microbiome. According to a recent study, total microbiome diversity was positively associated with increased sleep efficiency and total sleep time. 4

Keep moving to keep your immune system strong. Similar to adequate sleep, exercise boosts T cell production in the body to fight disease. Research shows that regular exercise prevents the immune system from aging and helps with preventing both communicable diseases such as cold and flu and non-communicable diseases like cancer and chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis. Evidence also exists that a single bout of exercise after receiving a vaccination enhances the immune response. 5   Don’t forget to get your flu vaccine, too!

A nutritious diet is also important in maintaining a healthy immune system. Fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin C such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale, citrus fruit, and berries protect the immune system by stimulating the production of antibodies. Vitamin A found in fortified dairy products, eggs and a variety of dark green and orange fruits and vegetables may help fight infection by keeping the lining of the mouth, respiratory and gastrointestinal system intact. High-quality protein sources such as lean meat, fish, pork, poultry, beans, nuts, and soy products are also important to aid in wound healing and antibody production. Finally, fermented foods including kefir, kimchi, miso, sauerkraut, and yogurt contain probiotics to help keep gut bacteria thriving.

How should you prepare for the Coronavirus if it spreads?

The CDC has been providing alerts about the spread of the virus as well as the number of confirmed cases and deaths. Watch the CDC web site and news reports for updates. Stay away from anyone that’s sick. Stock up on medicine such as Tylenol (to break a fever), cough and cold medicine and anti-mucus medication such as Mucinex. Don’t forget a box of tissues! Keep easy to prepare food on hands such as eggs, canned beans or lentils, broth for soup, frozen vegetables, seasonal fruit, bread, and milk. If you do catch the virus, stay put to prevent the spread to others.

The CDC lists these 4 steps to lower the likelihood of getting sick:

  1. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  2. Avoid contact with anyone who is sick.
  3. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects.
  4. Wash your hands often with soap and water.

What to do if you get sick

First off, don’t panic.

  • The Coronavirus is similar to the flu and is contagious. 6
  • Stay home except for medical care. Call your doctor if you suspect being sick from COVID-19 or experience a high fever or shortness of breath. Alert your doctor before your appointment if you suspect COVID-19.
  • Quarantine yourself from others (including animals) and wear a mask if/when you go out to prevent the spread of illness.
  • Wash your hands often to kill germs.
  • Try not to touch your mouth, eyes, and nose.
  • Cough into a tissue if needed and throw it out.
  • Don’t share personal household items such as towels, hairbrushes, dishes, cups, cutlery, etc.
  • Keep track of your symptoms. Stay home until the risk of spreading your illness to others is low.
  • Use a household cleaner to clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects.
  • Drink plenty of fluids (water, 100% fruit juice, broth in soup) to stay hydrated as having a fever increases fluid loss in your body.
  • Get enough sleep. Adults should aim for 7 to 8 hours per night or more each night. More is always okay if you feel sick or exhausted.

Resources:

  1. Worldmeter
  2. WHO
  3. CDC
  4. US Travel advisories

References:

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/summary.html
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm
  3. Jeffrey A. Haspel,1Ron Anafi,2 Marishka K. Brown,3 Nicolas Cermakian,4 Christopher Depner,5 Paula Desplats,6,7 Andrew E. Gelman,8 Monika Haack,9 Sanja Jelic,10 Brian S. Kim,11,12,13,14,15 Aaron D. Laposky,3 Yvonne C. Lee,16 Emmanuel Mongodin,17 Aric A. Prather,18 Brian J. Prendergast,19 Colin Reardon,20 Albert C. Shaw,21 Shaon Sengupta,22,23 Éva Szentirmai,24 Mahesh Thakkar,25,26 Wendy E. Walker,27 and Laura A. Solt28 JCI Insight. 2020 Jan 16; 5(1): e131487.
  4. Robert P. Smith, Cole Easson, Sarah M. Lyle, Ritishka Kapoor, Chase P. Donnelly, Eileen J. Davidson, Esha Parikh, Jose V. Lopez,Jaime L. Tartar . Perfect timing: circadian rhythms, sleep, and immunity — an NIH workshop summary. Gut microbiome diversity is associated with sleep physiology in humans Published: October 7, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0222394
  5. John P. Campbell*and James E. Turner* Debunking the Myth of Exercise-Induced Immune Suppression: Redefining the Impact of Exercise on Immunological Health Across the Lifespan Front Immunol. 2018; 9: 648.
  6. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention-treatment.html

 

Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

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The latest romaine lettuce scare has left many of us wondering, “what’s going on with the greens”? This is the second Thanksgiving that many of us left salad off the menu. It’s a legitimate concern. E-coli is a serious food-borne illness and we need to heed the advice of “when in doubt, throw it out”, when it comes to food recalls. Fortunately, there are plenty of other greens to enjoy this holiday season.

Whenever possible, green leafy vegetables should be on your plate. Consumption of green leafy vegetables is not only linked with a reduction in cancer and heart disease, but research suggests the consumption of lutein-containing vegetables (like spinach and kale) improves respiratory health. Lutein is a fat-soluble antioxidant that’s also found in eggs. 1   In addition, a study done in India found that including a snack containing green leafy vegetables, fruit, and milk before and during pregnancy prevented gestational diabetes. 2 That’s important news for your clients that are expecting.

Below are 12 simple ways to enjoy more greens this holiday season!

  1. Start with breakfast. Add chopped spinach, kale or broccoli to your omelets or frittatas.
  2. Roast Brussel sprouts. Roasting sweetens and crisps these bitter tiny cabbages. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Clean and slice Brussels sprouts in half. Place sprouts on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush with olive oil, dust with salt and pepper and roast for 20 minutes until crispy.
  3. Use fresh spinach for salads. Spinach makes an excellent salad base and can be used solo or mingled with other greens.
  4. Try Swiss chard and bean soup. Sautee a medium onion, 3 chopped carrots and 3 chopped celery stalks in 2 Tbsp. olive oil. Add 1 clove chopped garlic, 1 tsp. dried oregano and 1 tsp. dried rosemary and stir until the vegetables are coated in spices. Add 1 large bunch cleaned and chopped Swiss chard. Include the chopped stems for more flavor, fiber, and color. Add 6 cups vegetable or chicken broth and 2 cans, drained/rinsed Navy, Great Northern or another white bean. Simmer on medium heat for 30-45 minutes until vegetables are fully cooked.
  5. Add shaved Brussels sprouts to your salads. Pair with an apple cider vinaigrette made with 1 tsp. olive oil, 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar, ½ tsp. Dijon mustard and a squeeze of honey.
  6. Keep a fresh bag of spinach leaves to add to leftovers. Place 2 cups spinach leaves at the bottom of your microwave-safe bowl. Top the leaves with your leftover pasta dish, Indian food or another cuisine. Microwave for 2 to 3 minutes to reheat. Stir in the spinach once reheated.
  7. Make a salad with arugula. This peppery green is also known as a garden rocket and is an excellent source of vitamin K and beta-carotene. Pair arugula with chopped pears, blue cheese, slivered almonds and a lemon vinaigrette made with 2 Tbsp. lemon juice, 2 Tbsp. olive oil, 1 tsp. Dijon mustard and 1 tsp. honey.
  8. Serve roasted broccoli at your holiday dinner. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Clean and chop broccoli into 1” pieces (including broccoli stalks). Brush with canola or olive oil and dust with garlic powder and seasoned salt. Roast for 20 minutes and serve.
  9. Try a kale salad. The secret to kale is to massage it! Place a bunch of cleaned, ripped kale in a gallon-sized plastic bag with 1 tsp. canola or corn oil. Massage the kale in the bag until coated with oil and shiny. Place kale in a large salad bowl with 1 chopped Granny smith or another crisp apple, ¼ cup dried cherries, ¼ cup chopped pecans and ¼ cup shaved Parmesan cheese. Toss with balsamic vinaigrette and serve.
  10. Try Brazilian style collard greens. Clean and chop 4 cups of collards. Heat a large skillet to medium heat and add 1 Tbsp. canola or corn oil. Sautee the greens until slightly brown. Add 2 cloves chopped garlic to the greens and cook for 2-3 minutes longer. Add ½ tsp. red pepper flakes and 1 Tbsp. lemon juice and toss before serving.
  11. Top your favorite pizza with arugula when it’s right out of the oven.
  12. Add greens to your smoothies. Spinach, kale, or arugula mix in well with bananas, yogurt, and your favorite berries.

 Handout:  Holiday Greens

References:

1.    Melo van Lent D1Leermakers ETM1Darweesh SKL1Moreira EM1Tielemans MJ1Muka T1Vitezova A1Chowdhury R2Bramer WM3Brusselle GG4Felix JF1Kiefte-de Jong JC5Franco OH1. The effects of lutein on respiratory health across the life course: A systematic review. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2016 Jun;13:e1-e7.

2.  Sahariah SA1Potdar RD1Gandhi M1Kehoe SH2Brown N2Sane H1Coakley PJ2Marley-Zagar E2Chopra H1Shivshankaran D1Cox VA2Jackson AA3Margetts BM4Fall CH5. A Daily Snack Containing Leafy Green Vegetables, Fruit, and Milk before and during Pregnancy Prevents Gestational Diabetes in a Randomized, Controlled Trial in Mumbai, India. J Nutr.2016 Jul;146(7):1453S-60S.

FMI: Romaine Recall by Cheryle Jones Syracuse

Submitted by Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

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Peppers are not just another pretty vegetable. Packed with vitamin C and water, they can be added to at least a dozen different dishes to boost color, taste, and texture. Beyond vitamin C, red bell peppers contain the antioxidant capsanthin, which gives them their bright red color while yellow bell peppers contain violaxanthin. They also contain polyphenol quercetin, which is linked with reduction of heart disease and cancer. 1

While bell peppers may be the most popular of the species, jalapeno, chili, and serrano peppers add heat and flavor to your meals. These hot peppers contain a chemical called capsaicin in their seeds which has been linked with anti-tumor activity as well as metabolism-boosting properties. 2, 3 Below are a handful of ideas on how to use these versatile veggies.

  1. Start your day with peppers and eggs. Sautee bell peppers with onions and toss them in your eggs, omelets or frittatas. Serve the eggs on a whole-wheat English muffin or rye toast.
  2. Try Chili Rellenos. Preheat your oven to broil. Broil 6 poblano peppers on a parchment paper-lined tray for 10 minutes. Let cooked peppers steam in a covered bowl for 15 minutes as they cool. Rinse cooled peppers and cut a slit along the side then peel off their skins and remove their seeds. Stuff the peppers with thick strips of Mexican cheese (queso asaderos). Whisk 2 egg yolks in a bowl and add 1 tsp. baking powder. In another bowl, whisk 2 egg whites. Fold egg whites into egg yolks. In a separate bowl, add ¾ cup flour. Heat 1 cup canola oil for frying. Roll a pepper in flour then dip then in egg mixture before frying to a light brown. Repeat with each pepper.
  3. Add chopped jalapeno peppers to your pasta or brown rice for a kick of flavor.
  4. Make mango peach salsa with serrano peppers. Mix together 2 chopped mangos, 2 cups fresh peaches, 2 cloves minced garlic, ¼ cup chopped cilantro, ¼ cup fresh lime juice, 2 diced serrano peppers, and ¼ tsp. cumin. Serve with tortilla chips or fish tacos.
  5. Add poblano peppers to enchiladas, burritos, tacos or other favorite Latin dishes.
  6. Sautee bell peppers with onions and use with fajitas, tacos, or sandwiches.
  7. Include chopped Anaheim peppers in chili, soup or stir-fries. They’re milder than other peppers.
  8. Make stuffed peppers for dinner. Cut the tops off of 4 bell peppers and hollow out the seeds. Stuff peppers with a ½ cup mixture of white rice and ground beef seasoned with garlic, cumin, and salt. Place in a baking dish and cover with tomato sauce then bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
  9. Enjoy Parmesan peppers. Place 4 quartered bell peppers on a baking sheet after removing their stems, core, and seeds. Toss with 1 clove minced garlic, 1 Tbsp. oregano, 1 Tbsp. olive oil and 1 tsp. salt. Roast skin side down on 425 until soft. Top with Parmesan cheese and serve once the cheese has melted.
  10. Top sandwiches or pizza with hot pickled pepper rings.
  11. Make ancho red pepper sauce. Place 3 ancho chili pods in a large bowl. Cover with boiling water and let them rest for 30 minutes. Take off the stems and chop the peppers. Reserve the liquid. Heat 2 Tbsp. canola oil in a large pan. Add 1 chopped onion, 3 cloves minced garlic, 2 seeded tomatoes, 3 roasted/chopped peppers and ancho chilis and cook for 20 to 30 minutes until tomatoes are completely soft. Cool the tomatoes, then place in a blender with the reserved liquid, 2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar, 1 ½ Tbsp. honey and ¼ cup fresh cilantro. Move sauce to a container and refrigerate until ready to use.
  12. Enjoy a variety of pepper strips with your favorite hummus.

Ready for a great dinner? See what we made with peppers and more for a Fajita dinner right here!

References:

1.      Yamagata K1. Polyphenols Regulate Endothelial Functions and Reduce the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease. Curr Pharm Des. 2019;25(22):2443-2458.

  1. Liu Y.P., Dong F.X., Chai X., Zhu S., Zhang B.L. and Gao D.S. (2016) Role of autophagy in capsaicin-induced apoptosis in U251 glioma cells.  Mol. Neurobiol.36, 737–743
  2. Jia Zheng,1Sheng Zheng,2 Qianyun Feng,2 Qian Zhang,1 and Xinhua Xiao 1 Dietary capsaicin and its anti-obesity potency: from mechanism to clinical implications. Biosci Rep. 2017 Jun 30; 37(3)

Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

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The humble carrot is not always the highlight of most recipes, but this orange (and sometimes white, yellow or purple) vegetable has a lot to brag about.

Carrots are part of the Umbelliferae family along with celery, parsnips, fennel, and anise. These savory vegetables add great flavor to several dishes. Research suggests that eating more vegetables containing beta carotene, such as carrots, can help reduce the risk of prostate cancer. 1   

Carrots are also known for their prevention of heart disease. A large Dutch study including over 20,000 men and women found that eating just ½ a carrot a day reduced the risk of heart disease by 32%!2 Carrots are not only nutritious, they’re also inexpensive and versatile. Below are a dozen ways to enjoy them!

  1. Add shredded carrots to quick bread or smoothies. It’s an easy way to sneak them into food.
  2. Carrot raisin salad. Carrots are naturally sweet and pair nicely with raisins, pineapple and light dressing. Combine 4 cups shredded carrots with ¾ cup golden or dark raisins and ½ cup fresh or canned pineapple. Whisk together ¼ cup light mayonnaise, 2 Tbsp. lemon juice with 2 Tbsp. honey. Toss shredded carrots, raisins, and pineapple in dressing.
  3. Roasted carrots. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Slice clean carrots lengthwise and cut into 4” pieces. Place them on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Brush them with olive oil then dust them with cinnamon, cumin, and seasoned salt. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes until tender.
  4. Add diced carrots to soup, stew, or chili for color, flavor, and texture.
  5. Enjoy raw carrots with hummus, baba ganoush, or yogurt dip.
  6. Add shredded carrots to tossed salads or pasta salads.
  7. Cut carrots into matchsticks and add to your favorite stir-fries. Their beautiful color and texture are great in several dishes.
  8. Try carrot & date muffins. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. In a large mixing bowl, combine 1 cup rolled oats, 1 cup all-purpose flour, ½ cup brown sugar, ½ tsp. salt, 1 tsp. baking powder, ½ tsp. baking soda, and 2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice (or cinnamon). Add ½ cup chopped dates and 3 medium carrots (shredded) and toss with flour mixture. In a separate bowl, whisk 1 egg with ¼ cup corn oil, 1 cup milk, and 2 tsp. vanilla extract. Add egg mixture to flour mixture and stir to combine. Pour batter into lined muffin tin and bake for 20 to 25 minutes until done. Dust with powdered sugar if desired.
  9. Enjoy grilled carrots! Cut carrots lengthwise into 5” pieces. Brush with olive oil then dust with oregano, salt, and pepper. Grill until soft.
  10. Try honey-roasted carrots with rosemary. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Cut 4 large carrots into 4” pieces. In a small saucepan, combine 2 Tbsp. butter, 2 tsp honey, and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Place carrots on a parchment paper-lined baking pan and drizzle the honey butter over them. Dust the carrots with dried rosemary before baking for 20 to 25 minutes.
  11. Sauteed carrots with orange and cardamom. Peel and cut 2 lbs. of carrots and slice them diagonally into ¼” cuts. In a large saucepan, combine 1/3 cup orange juice, 1 tsp. sea salt, 1 tsp. pepper, 1 Tbsp. butter and ½ tsp. cardamom. Cover the pan and simmer the carrots for 10 to 15 minutes until soft.
  12. Carrot ginger salad. In a large bowl, combine 3 cups shredded carrots with ¾ cup unsweetened shredded coconut, ½ cup chopped pecans, 1 cup golden raisins and 2 chopped Granny Smith apples. In a separate bowl, whisk together 1 cup vanilla yogurt and 2 tsp. minced ginger or ginger paste. Pour the yogurt dressing over the carrot mixture and blend well before serving.

References:

1.      Key, T. et. al, Carotenoids, retinol, tocopherols, and prostate cancer risk: pooled analysis of 15 studies. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 102, Issue 5, November 2015, Pages 1142–1157

2.     Silva Dias, Nutritional and Health Benefits of CarrotsFood and Nutrition Sciences, 2014, 5:2147-2156

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Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

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With the popularity of low carb diets, cauliflower has been in the spotlight as the “new rice”. But there’s lots more to love about cauliflower beyond its low carb count.

Cauliflower is part of the cabbage family, right up there with broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage. These cruciferous veggies are known for their anti-oxidant prowess in preventing certain types of cancer and heart disease. A recent study showed that phytochemicals such as glucosinolate in cauliflower and other cruciferous vegetables, help reduce the risk of bladder cancer.1 Other research suggests that the compound 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM), derived from indole-3-carbinol in cruciferous vegetables, may hold promise in preventing liver cancer. 2 Below are a dozen ways to enjoy “caulipower”.

  1. Add cauliflower to your morning omelet. Why should peppers and onions get all the attention? Chop and steam 1 cup of cauliflower, season with salt and pepper and toss it into your eggs.
  2. Roast cauliflower with garlic and turmeric. The triple threat against inflammation and cancer! Preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place cleaned chopped cauliflower in a single layer on the paper. Mix 1 Tbsp. olive oil, 1 loved crushed garlic and 1 tsp. turmeric together. Brush cauliflower with the olive oil mixture and roast for 20 minutes.
  3. Serve raw cauliflower with hummus and other vegetables for a simple snack.
  4. Add cauliflower to your stir fry. Sautee chopped cauliflower with ginger, garlic, chili garlic paste, low-sodium soy sauce and a drizzle of sesame oil.
  5. Marinate chopped cauliflower in Italian dressing along with grape tomatoes and a small chunk of mozzarella cheese. Place on skewers and serve as appetizers.
  6. Make cauliflower slaw. Grate 1 cup cauliflower, 1 cup red cabbage, and 3 carrots together and place in a small bowl. Whisk together 1 tsp. Dijon mustard, 1 Tbsp. lemon juice and 1 Tbsp. olive oil. Toss the veggies in the dressing and serve cold.
  7. Rice that cauliflower. Clean and chop the head of cauliflower. Sautee in a medium skillet with 1 Tbsp. oil for 5 minutes, then cover the skillet, turn heat to low and let steam for another 5 to 8 minutes. Mash with potato masher. Season as desired with salt & pepper, soy sauce, garlic, etc.
  8. Try buffalo-style cauliflower. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees. Whisk together 1 cup milk, 1 cup flour, ¾ tsp. garlic powder, and ¼ tsp. salt in a bowl. Clean, dry and cut 1 head of cauliflower into 1” pieces. Coat the cauliflower pieces in the milk mixture, then place on a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake for 18 minutes until golden brown. While cauliflower bakes, whisk together 1/3 cup buffalo wing sauce and 1 ½ Tbsp. melted butter or margarine. Serve the cauliflower with wing sauce.
  9. Mashed cauliflower and parsnips. Parsnips mixed with cauliflower make a great potato substitute for your patients that may be limiting their carbs for weight loss or blood sugar management. Boil 1 lb. peeled & cubed parsnips with 1 head of cleaned/chopped cauliflower for 15 to 20 minutes until soft. Drain water and add 1 tsp. salt, 1 tsp. garlic powder, 1 tsp. dried rosemary, 1 Tbsp. butter and ¼ cup milk. Mash the parsnips and cauliflower until smooth. Add more milk if thinner texture desired.
  10. Parmesan-roasted cauliflower. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees. Clean and cut one head of cauliflower and place it in a gallon-sized plastic bag with 1 Tbsp. olive oil. Shake the bag to coat the cauliflower. Add 1 tsp. garlic salt, 1 cup bread crumbs, and ½ cup shredded Parmesan cheese to the bag. Shake to coat the cauliflower then spread it on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Bake cauliflower for 20 minutes, then flip it and bake for another 10 minutes.
  11. Creamy curry cauliflower soup. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Clean and cut 1 head of cauliflower and place in a large bowl with ½ cup chopped onion, 2 ½ tsp. curry powder, ½ tsp. ground cumin and 3 Tbsp. olive oil. Toss to coat the cauliflower. Roast on a parchment-lined baking sheet for 20 to 30 minutes until soft. Place roasted cauliflower in a large pot with 3 cups chicken or vegetable broth and boil for 10 minutes. Turn the heat to a low simmer and add 1 ½ cups light cream. Stir to blend. Garnish with freshly ground pepper and chopped green onions.
  12. Roasted cauliflower with dried cherries and almonds. Try this sweet, savory side dish for something different. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees. Clean and cut a head of cauliflower and place on a greased baking sheet or one lined with parchment paper. Roast in the oven for 10 minutes, turn and roast for another 20 minutes. Place in the serving dish and keep warm. While cauliflower roasts, melt 1 Tbsp. butter and saute 1/3 cup chopped almonds. Add ½ cup chopped, dried cherries and 1 tsp. cinnamon to the buttered almonds. Heat for 2 to 3 minutes then add the butter mixture to the roasted cauliflower. Toss to coat and serve warm.

Download now: our favorite recipe for "cauli-taters" or mashed potatoes with cauliflower

Activity idea: hold a contest to see who has the most creative cauliflower recipe! Or set up a caulipower bar with cauliflower and toppings and allow people to make their own creations!

25 More Broccoli Recipes

References:

1.    Abbaoui B1,2,3Lucas CR3,4,5Riedl KM2,5Clinton SK5,6Mortazavi A5,6. Cruciferous Vegetables, Isothiocyanates, and Bladder Cancer Prevention. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2018 Sep;62(18

2.    Jiang Y1,2Fang Y1,3Ye Y1Xu X4Wang B5Gu J6Aschner M7Chen J4Lu R1,8. Anti-Cancer Effects of 3, 3'-Diindolylmethane on Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Is Enhanced by Calcium Ionophore: The Role of Cytosolic Ca2+ and p38 MAPK. Front Pharmacol. 2019 Oct 9;10:1167.

 

Submitted by Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

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Broccoli used to be a polarizing vegetable. You either loved it or loathed it.

Fortunately, more people seem to be in the love broccoli camp, and what’s not to love? This green beauty from the cruciferous cabbage family is chock full of nutrients from beta-carotene to vitamin K. Research shows that compounds in broccoli are not only protective against cancer, but new research shows it may also help to preserve your memory. 1 Below are 12 ways to enjoy this nutritional gem.

  1. Add chopped broccoli to your morning omelet or frittata. There is no reason that vegetables should only be offered at lunch or dinner.
  2. Pair fresh broccoli with hummus for a snack. Raw broccoli contains 30% more cancer-fighting sulforaphane than cooked broccoli.
  3. Toss chopped broccoli in a salad with spinach, carrots, tomatoes, and other nutritional heavy hitters. Drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette or honey mustard dressing.
  4. Add frozen broccoli to soup. It won’t even need to be thawed first! Include it in minestrone or other vegetable centered soup.
  5. Include chopped broccoli in pasta and rice dishes. This adds color, texture and more nutritional value to your grains.
  6. Try broccoli pesto. In a food processor, combine ½ pound steamed/drained broccoli florets with 2 garlic cloves, 1 cup tightly packed fresh basil, 1/3 cup olive oil and 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese. Pesto can be used as a spread with crackers or over pasta.
  7. Roast that broccoli! Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking pan with parchment paper and place cleaned, chopped broccoli on the paper. Brush broccoli with olive and dust lightly with salt and freshly ground pepper. Roast for 20 minutes and serve.
  8. Stir fry broccoli in corn or peanut oil with low-sodium soy sauce, minced garlic and ginger paste. Drizzle sesame oil over the broccoli before serving over rice or quinoa.
  9. Make broccoli cheddar soup. Add 1 Tbsp. olive oil to a small pan. Sautee ½ chopped onion and 3 celery stalks until translucent, then set aside. In a large soup pot, make a roux by whisking ¼ cup flour in ¼ cup melted butter. Add a few tablespoons of milk to keep flour from burning. Add 2 cups 2% milk into flour mixture gradually and whisk continuously. Add 2 cups of low-sodium chicken or vegetable stock to the milk mixture. Simmer for 20 minutes, then add 1 ½ cups chopped broccoli, 1 cup chopped carrots and sautéed onions and celery and simmer another 20 minutes. Add in 2 ½ cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese. Once the cheese melts into the vegetable mixture, salt, and pepper to taste and serve.
  10. Season steamed broccoli with fresh lime juice, black pepper, and cumin for something deliciously different.
  11. Try a broccoli Caesar salad. Mash 2 oil-packed anchovy fillets and 1 garlic clove together to form a paste (or leave anchovies out). In a large serving bowl, place garlic paste, ¼ cup lemon juice, 2 tsp. Dijon mustard, ½ cup olive oil, and 2 Tbsp. mayonnaise and whisk together to make the dressing. Add 1 ½ lb. chopped broccoli, 2 cups chopped Napa cabbage and 2 Tbsp. shredded Parmesan to the dressing and toss to coat the vegetables. Add freshly ground pepper at the end and serve.
  12. Roasted broccoli stalks. The woody stalks of broccoli are surprisingly sweet. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees, then clean and trim broccoli stalks/stems of any woody parts using a vegetable peeler. Cut into 1/2” rounds and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Drizzle olive oil, freshly ground pepper and salt. Roast for 35 minutes or until soft. Toss with shredded Parmesan cheese and serve.

Here are our 6 favorite broccoli recipes:

Over 90 broccoli recipes for members here

All broccoli content here

Reference

Klomparens EA1Ding Y1,2.

The neuroprotective mechanisms and effects of sulforaphane. Brain Circ. 2019 Apr-Jun;5(2):74-83. doi: 10.4103/bc.bc_7_19. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

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